REPOTTING HOUSE PLANTS

Repotting is a necessary evil of owning house plants and with so much information out there, its easy to get overwhelmed about how to take the best care of your leafy friends. But not to fear! As Miss Moss stocks a range of terrariums, fern bowls and other potted goodies, we are well versed in the process and today, we will take you through the system in just a few easy steps. Grab your gardening gloves and let’s get started!

YOU WILL NEED:

  1. A trowel or other similar hand tool
  2. Potting mix (for house plants, potting mix typically labelled ‘Premium’ with good nutrient content and containing peat moss are good options)
  3. A plant that is in need of a repot (look out for roots growing out of the base, lack of new growth and any mould/fungus growing in or on top of the soil)
  4. A new pot. As seen in the picture, you want a pot that is about 2-3cm wider than the original pot on either side, with good drainage.
‘You will need’ photo

STEP 1: FILL THE NEW POT

Add your potting mix to the new pot about 1/3 of the way full. This may vary depending on the pot’s size.

‘Step 1’ Photo

STEP 2: REMOVE PLANT FROM OLD POT

Gently twist and wiggle the new pot off of the plant’s roots. Try to squeeze the pot rather than pull the plant to minimise the risk of damage to the plant. Once it’s off, separate and spread the bottom roots slightly to ensure they’re loose enough to take root in the new soil.

‘Step 2’ 1/2
‘Step 2’ 2/2

STEP 3: PLACE PLANT IN NEW POT

With the fresh soil in the bottom of the pot, place your plant down in the centre. You want the base of the plant to be level with the top of the pot. If it sticks out above or sinks too low, you may need to add/remove soil before the next step.

‘Step 3’ Photo

STEP 4: FILL POT

Continue to fill in the soil around the sides of the plant.

‘Step 4’ photo 1/2
‘Step 4’ Photo 2/2

STEP 5: WATER

Make sure to give the plant a proper water after you’re done. Keep an eye out at the base and don’t stop watering until you see water running out of the drainage holes. That’s the sign the plant has had enough to drink. This is also necessary to make sure all the roots are coated and there are no air pockets in the soil. Now you can enjoy your newly potted plant!

Step 5 1/2
‘Step 5’ photo 2/2

REPOTTING FAQ’S:

What time of year should I repot?
Typically early spring while the plant is actively growing and the temperature is warmer is the best time, however if your plant is in distress (browning leaves/exposed roots, bug infestation etc) it is always better to repot than to wait.

My pot has no drainage, does that mean I can’t use it?
This question gets asked regularly in the shop and typically involves certain kinds of ceramic pots. My advice would be to head to Bunnings with your desired pot, find a growers pot the same size, and then repot into that. Then it can sit inside your other pot and can be easily lifted out for watering purposes.

What can I do to reduce the risk of transfer shock?
Seasol or other house plant fertiliser (used as per their instructions) will help reduce the risk of transplant shock and make sure the plant is getting enough energy to adjust to its new environment. Also making sure that the plant is getting enough light and water is an important step to success.

Now you have all the knowledge required, go forth with confidence and give those plants the refresh they need!

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